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November 2008

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Nov. 20th, 2008

Sunshine -Strong enough

phfa

(no subject)

Hey guys :)

A new membership (hi!) prompted me to, well, remember about this community, which we don't do anything with, and see if there was still interest. Got any opinions on the way mythis fiction and urban fantasy is going these days? Got any books to talk about, either praise or bitching? Got any writing ideas to share?

Got anything? :D

Feb. 16th, 2008

fairy

persephone_20

(no subject)

Darcy had never had a problem believing that fairy myths were true. Living in Ireland, she had grown up with myths of banshees, of selkies and the Sidhe, of Seelie and Unseelie courts.

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Feb. 15th, 2008

fairy

persephone_20

(no subject)

"I am going to write a story, a story of what was, and what has been, a story according to the ways I have seen it."

Darcy smiled at her computer screen, typing and thinking the words in her head. As she considered the larger story, her gaze slid across to the lil'un sitting on top of her computer machine, swinging legs back and forth, precariously close to the power button, even as he looked at her. Darcy could remember a time when she'd thought that anything working that hard to look innocent couldn't possibly be, and with most fairies, that theory appeared correct. Since Scratch, however, Darcy had begun to see differently.

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Aug. 23rd, 2007

Amanda - The darkness in the day

phfa

(no subject)

Morning everyone :)

For those of you who don't know me I'm Alison or Ali or Raen, pretty obviously a big fan of urban fantasy, and writing... clearly. I'm not hugely organised (I used to be, but then Uni taught me how to procrastinate) but I'm hoping to put up prompts with optimistic regularity.

The first prompt I'm going with is one of the great staples of fantasy- the Changeling. A human child stolen away by faeries who often leave a replacement in the child's place- except I'm going to broaden the theme to make it any human taken by faeries- you can decide how and where and who. Like Tam Lin, but urbanised.

Come away, O human child
To the waters and wild
With a faery hand in hand
For the world's more full of weeping than you can understand


The Stolen Child by William Butler Yeats, also sung by Loreena McKinnett. A line from which inspired the name of this community, so it's only fitting.

Tithe be Holly Black is the first example of a modern day changeling story I can think of- and its sequel Ironside. Set in New York, very cool :D

A Piece of Flesh by Adam Stemple is a short story, same topic, fantastic because who doesn't like a protagonist with questionable mental stability?

Just a little pimping there. Anyone else know any good ones?

Aug. 21st, 2007

Amanda - The darkness in the day

phfa

Reference/Definitions

Hello! This is just one of those reference posts to make sure everyone's basically on the same page. Some explanations for the genres mentioned on ther userinfo:

Urban fantasy is a subset of contemporary fantasy, consisting of magical novels and stories set in contemporary, real-world, urban settings--as opposed to 'traditional' fantasy set in wholly imaginary landscapes, even ones containing imaginary cities, or having most of their action take place in them. The modern urban fantasy protagonist faces extraordinary circumstances as plots unfold in either open (where magic or paranormal events are commonly accepted to exist) or closed (where magical powers or creatures are concealed) worlds.

Magic realism (or magical realism) is an artistic genre in which magical elements appear in an otherwise realistic setting.

Mythic fiction is literature that is rooted in, inspired by, or that in some way draws from the tropes, themes and symbolism of myth, folklore, and fairy tales. (The term is widely credited to Charles de Lint and Terri Windling ♥♥♥)

Fairytale fantasy is distinguished from other subgenres of fantasy by the works' heavy use of motifs, and often plots, from folklore.